7 Keys to Creating a Successful Sales Cadence [4 Templates You Can Steal Right Away]

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It is the cold that is dead NOT the calling. Remember that :))

Trish Bertuzzi, the author of “The Sales Development Playbook,” CEO of The Bridge Group, Inc. and Inside Sales Evangelist, mentioned this in a comment on LinkedIn.

Trish is right.

It’s no more cold calls. It’s warm calls.

And to make warm calls, you need to do your homework on the prospect and follow up with them at regular intervals.

That’s why you need a well-designed sales cadence to reach out, engage and make yourself familiar to the prospect.

In our recent blog, we discussed the basics of sales cadence and how to do it right. Today, we’ll discuss seven key elements for creating a successful sales cadence for your business. Plus, we are also giving you four sales cadence templates which you can steal right away.

Download our best sales cadence templates that will keep your sales funnel always full

The 7 keys to creating a successful sales cadence

  1. The buyer persona
  2. The media for communication
  3. The number of contact attempts
  4. The time gap between each attempt
  5. Duration of the cadence
  6. The message
  7. Test and optimize

The buyer persona

The first step in creating a sales cadence is to identify your buyer persona. This could be C-level executives, VPs, directors, managers, and supervisors. The sales cadence will differ for each buyer persona. For example, the sales cadence for C-level executives of a mid-market company will have more personalized emails and lesser phone calls, while the cadence for managers and supervisors will have an equal number of emails, social channels, and phone calls.

If you are using Account Based Selling (ABS) to reach out to prospects, each of your Tier accounts can have a sales cadence. Your cadence would include highly personalized cold emails and more cold calls for your Tier 1 accounts. Whereas, the sales cadence for Tier 3 account would include generic cold emails and LinkedIn messages.

The media for communication

The usual modes of communication with prospects are social channels, text messages, email, phone, and voicemails. And a good sales cadence includes all these modes of communication. If you find your prospects responding to emails than LinkedIn InMail and text messages, use that to your advantage and tweak your sales cadence.

In fact, the channel for communication also depends on the industry and the buyer persona. For example, direct mailers, handwritten notes, and in-person meetings work for certain industries. You can include those modes of communication while creating your sales cadence.

For shorter sales cycles and smaller deal size, you can go aggressive and use the phone to get in touch with your prospects. For longer sales cycles and bigger deal size, you can start off with social channels, email and then move to phone calls when they have shown some engagement with the earlier two media.

The number of contact attempts

One of the mistakes which most sales reps make is not following up enough with a prospect. They follow up once, probably thrice and when they don’t get a response, they simply move to the next prospect.

That’s a wrong approach.

Your sales cadence should include about 6 follow-up emails, 3 phone calls, and 3 LinkedIn messages. In short, your cadence should include about 14-15 touchpoints with the prospect.

The time gap between each attempt

How often should you connect with the prospect? Do you give a day or two between one sales activity and another? The spacing between touchpoints is particularly important because you don’t want to bombard the prospect with too many touchpoints at once. Ideally, sales reps give a good 3 days between each touchpoint. The tip here is to keep the time gap consistent between each attempt.

Duration of the cadence

Duration is the length of the sales cadence—from the first touch point to the last. The ideal duration of your sales cadence should be about two to four weeks. This, of course, depends on the prospect’s engagement with your email and phone call.

If the prospect does not show any interest to any of your touchpoints—does not respond to calls and voicemails, and does not open emails—there isn’t any point pursuing further and you can stop communicating with the prospect after two weeks.

For prospects who have shown passive signs of interest like opening and reading your email, clicking on the email links, and not blocking you on LinkedIn, a four-week cadence is good enough for the prospect to express interest or ask you to remove them from their mailing list.

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The message

The way you open your email or the way you open the cold call has a huge impact on the prospect’s interaction with you. While personalizing the email subject line—mentioning the prospect’s or the company’s name—has a huge impact on the open rates, it’s also equally important to personalize the body of the email. Make sure your email copy includes,

  1. Why are you reaching out to them?
  2. What can you do to help?
  3. The benefits of starting a business relationship with you
  4. Mention other companies who are benefiting from your solution

Give your prospects an easy way to connect with you by adding a link to your calendar in your email signature. If you are cold calling, state the reason why you are calling, mention the one pressing problem they are trying to solve and provide your solution.

Test and optimize

Once you have set up the sales cadence, you can’t forget all about it. You need to see if the cadence is working for you and bringing you the desired results. So if you find that your prospects are not interacting with your email, try tweaking the email subject line or add more value-add points to the email body. Or, if you find that your prospects are more receptive to phone calls after lunch, you can plug that information in your sales cadence. The idea is to accumulate as much information as possible about your prospects and tweak your sales cadence accordingly.

Bonus! Automate using CRM

CRM software helps you automate your sales cadence by creating workflows and setting up sales campaigns. You can schedule calls and emails, track your sales activities and reduce time spent on manual data entry. In fact, CRM software like Freshsales lets you create email templates to follow up with your prospects in a personalized manner. The CRM also tracks the performance of the email templates—open and click rates—so you know what working and what does not. Freshsales also has a built-in phone that allows you to make calls and have them automatically recorded and linked to the prospect’s data.

Sales Cadence Examples

Sales Cadence Example 1: The Aggressive Approach

This two-week sales cadence works best when your sales cycle is short and deal size is small.

Business day 1: Send an automated email with the information you would like to share.
Send LinkedIn connection request with a note.

Business day 2: Call in the morning; no response call in the afternoon.

Business day 3: Send a personalized email in the morning. Call in the afternoon.

Business day 5: Send a follow-up email with a different value-add. Send a LinkedIn message in the afternoon.

Business day 7: Call in the morning. Call in the afternoon; leave a voicemail and email if no response.

Business day 10: Send the quasi-breakup email (permission to follow up). Send a text message in the afternoon.

Business day 12: Send a LinkedIn message in the morning. Call in the afternoon.

Business day 14: Call in the morning. Call in the afternoon; leave a voicemail and email if no response.

Business day 15: Call in the morning. Send a breakup email in the afternoon.

Sales Cadence Example 2: The Methodical Approach

This four-week sales cadence works best for long sales cycle and large deal value.

Business day 1: Send an automated email with the information you would like to share.

Business day 3: Send LinkedIn connection request with a note. Send a personalized email in the afternoon.

Business day 7: Send a follow-up email with a different value-add at a different timing.

Business day 10: Call in the morning. Send a text message in the afternoon.

Business day 15: Send a new email thread with a different value-add. Send a LinkedIn message in the afternoon.

Business day 17: Call in the morning. Call in the afternoon; leave a voicemail and email if no response.

Business day 20: Send a LinkedIn message in the morning. Call in the afternoon.

Business day 25: Call in the morning. Call in the afternoon; leave a voicemail and email if no response.

Business day 30: Call in the morning. Send the breakup email in the afternoon.

Sales Cadence example 3: Inbound sales cadence

This 30-day sales cadence works best for reps in inbound sales.

Business day 1: Call in the morning.

Business day 3: Call in the morning. Call in the afternoon; leave a voicemail and email if no response.

Business day 5: Send a follow-up email with a different value-add at a different timing. Send a message on LinkedIn

Business day 7: Call in the morning. Call in the evening; leave a voicemail if no response.

Business day 10: Send a new email thread with a different value-add.

Business day 15: Send a LinkedIn message in the morning. Send a text message in the afternoon.

Business day 20: Call in the morning. Call in the evening; leave a voicemail if no response.

Business day 25: Send a LinkedIn message in the morning. Send the quasi-breakup email in the afternoon.

Business day 30: Call in the morning. Call in the afternoon; leave a voicemail and email if no response.

Sales Cadence Example 4: The email-only cadence

This four-week email-only sales cadence works best for your Tier 3 accounts and can be automated in your sales campaign.

Business day 1: Send an email with the information you want to share

Business day 3: Send the first follow-up email

Business day 7: Send a new email thread with a different value-add at a different timing.

Business day 12: Send an email restating the call to action

Business day 17: Send a new email thread giving links to useful resources

Business day 23: Send the quasi-breakup email

Business day 28: Send the break-up email

Of course, the sales cadence differs by industry, the products, and the sales cycle. But these 4 sales cadence templates are a good starting point while creating a cadence for your business. Get creative and add your own spin to make it your own.

In the meantime, let’s have a conversation. Share your sales cadence and follow-up plan with us in the comments below.

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