Prospects can’t be defined simply by their age, gender, or income. Businesses that try to bucket their audience like this often don’t get the results they want. This is why psycographics is important to keep in mind and it’s easy to see why. Two 35-year-old women could have wildly different interests and lifestyles despite sharing the same birth year.

One might be a stay-at-home mother of three, while the other might be a high-flying businesswoman with no children. Sure, they’re the same age, but the things that matter to them will be completely different. 

Basing your targeting off of purely demographic information is doing your customers a disservice. Each one has a distinct personality, needs, habits, likes, and dislikes which need to be taken into account. 

psychographics

Understanding the behavior, fears, challenges, hopes, and dreams of your audience is far more valuable. Getting familiar with concepts associated with behavioral science (i.e. why people do certain things) can help you forge deeper connections with your customers. You will immediately have a better understanding of their biases, which can help you better evaluate opportunities and easily reach your goals. 

Psychographics definition: What is psychographics?

 

Psychographics is the understanding of people based on their aspirations, attitudes, and behavior. Unlike demographics, it digs deeper than surface level “facts” and delves into a customer’s personality, their lifestyle, and their goals. 

Psychographics push our boundaries of understanding prospects to a deeper, more intrinsic level, which makes it easier to create campaigns and products that customers actually need. 

 

“I’ve just finished running a series of interviews with my clients' customers, listening to the recordings, and pulling out insightful quotes to categorize under headings like Values, Personality, Trusted Resources (e.g. their favorite podcasts). I have weekly or bi-weekly customer conversations that continue to contribute and update my assumptions, which I use to update the customer personas that the content team uses to drive our focus.

One of the main reasons I began collecting psychographic data is lack of visibility and accuracy when it came to quantitative data. At least at first, I thought quantitative data was the gold standard of content, but I've come to realize understanding your customers (personas and ICPs) is just as important, if not more so, to creating engaging assets that spark interest in your audience.”

                                                                                                                                                   - Rachel Go, Content Marketer and Strategist 

How psychographics work together with demographics

 

 

  • Demographics: Statistical data about a person based on facts. This can include age, location, gender, religion, culture, income, and education 

  • Psychographics: Nuanced information about a person based on their behavior and attitudes. This can include goals, challenges, fears, and values 

Combining both demographic and psychographic information can create a complete picture of who you’re targeting. The more information you use from each, the more granular you can get and the more laser-focused your messaging will be. 

For example, if you target people based on three psychographic factors, like their hobbies, their biggest goal, and their life stage, and two demographic factors, like their age and location, you’ll have a much more focused persona than if you target just one psychographic factor and no demographic factors.  

There is another type of data that ties into all this: behavioral data. This refers to information about how visitors move around your website. It’s collected via a tracking cookie and identifies data like what device visitors are using, how they arrived on your site, how often they add items to their cart, how much they spend, and what product categories they’re most interested in. 

While demographic information and psychographics paint a more complex picture of your customers as individuals, behavioral data provides a comprehensive story of your customers’ journeys. 

How to track psychographic metrics?

It can be difficult to know what to focus on when it comes to psychographics. Here’s a list of factors you can track or use to segment your prospects: 

psychographic factors

Example of demographic and psychographic prospect profile

Let’s look at this in action with an example. 
 


 

Demographics of this prospect tells us a fair bit about the basics of this person, but it doesn’t tell us what makes her click, what she enjoys, or the things she loves most in life. Whereas the psychographic profile tells us a lot more about who the customer is outside of their age and job role.

It tells us what she enjoys doing, what gets her up in the morning, and how she spends her time. Health, fitness, crafts, beauty, and travel brands would all benefit from knowing this psychographic information.

All of these are invaluable bits of information in helping us reach the right people, at the right time, in the right place, with the right message. 

Psychographics vs demographics: 3 Key differences 

Psychographics and demographics are closely linked but come with their fair share of differences.
 

  • Psychographics refer to the consumer as a unique individual, whereas demographic data simply gives aggregate data about a mass of individuals
  • Psychographics provide a deeper level of understanding of prospects and help marketers see how and why they make their purchase decisions
  • Psychographics allow marketers to create highly-segmented campaigns based on a consumer’s wants and needs

How businesses can get psychographic data

You might have a vague idea about the psychographics of your audience, but it can often be detrimental to assume you know people’s lifestyles, values, goals, and challenges. Instead of taking a stab in the dark, use these methods to learn more about your audience.

1. Customer interviews

Interviews over Zoom or in-person are a great way to dig deep into a select few customers. Focusing on just a handful of customers allows you to deep dive into what your best prospects like and don’t like.

The key is to ask the right questions. As well as figuring out a customer’s age and location, ask them probing questions like: 

  • What is your biggest challenge right now?
  • If you had a free weekend, how would you spend it?
  • What’s your favorite evening activity?
  • What trending issue are you really passionate about right now?
abm target account

Record the interviews and identify any patterns in responses. You can then turn these into customer personas by creating profiles for each of the customers you interview. 

“Hands down, my favourite strategy for unearthing the psychographic data of customers is one-on-one investigative interviews. One customer interview can reveal unknown behaviors, motivations and emotions which are marketing gold. These insights unlock new campaign, content and copywriting ideas - all grounded in the voice of your customer.

In one recent interview a customer said "Before using X, I had low-level anxiety all the time. I was a marketing team of one, trying to keep all these pots simmering on a stove." Already we can see the type of prospect we should be targeting “Solo Marketer” and we have initial marketing ideas we can test:

  • We can use the exact quote and run the ads of a stressed-out marketer.  

  • Maybe a video or blog of a marketer taking us through the stressful day

  • A lead magnet ebook or webinar about how to survive as a solo marketer

After a slate of interviews, we keep all of this in a persona that outlines why they buy something, the entire journey they went through to buy it. It gives marketing the foundation they need to create campaigns that have a much better chance of influencing others.”

                                                                                                                                                                                       - Ryan Gibson, Founder of Content Lift    

Your business may be like Keesjan’s. As a growing company, you may position yourselves to grow with your customers. In another case, you may be at the size where you can prove you have the capacity to deliver on contracts with customers like Microsoft.

2. Surveys and questionnaires

 

While interviews let you dig deep into a select few of your best customers, surveys and questionnaires help you collect larger quantities of data in one go. You can still ask similar questions, but you’ll get a wider range of responses which can be good for identifying trends and patterns, but tricky when trying to quantify data. 

survey psychographics

The Semantics Group runs an annual survey to find out more about their customers.

3. Social listening

 

Your prospects and customers are freely hanging out on social media and having conversations in real-time. Tap into their discussions and pinpoint topics that keep cropping up. “Social listening” in this way can give you an idea of the subjects that matter the most to your customers, what kinds of questions they have, and what they’re most interested in. 

 

social listening psychographics

 

Coming across a Tweet like this can give you an insight into the kinds of tools your audience prefer and how they identify themselves. 

 

 

Alternatively, look out for responses to questions and threads that encourage people to share information about their lifestyles and interests. 

 

“Although we run user research sessions to find out more about start-up founders, we’ve learnt the most through observation – reading what they Tweet, joining the same forums as them and continually asking for feedback on our products.
 
Because of this, we know that start-up founders in the US are typically left-leaning when it comes to politics, tend to be very early-adopters, love everything techy and are more likely to take part in solo sports like endurance running than a team sport.
 
This allows us to tailor every aspect of our marketing, starting with which platforms we should be on (Twitter is the go-to social media platform for entrepreneurs and VCs), the type of content we should create (helpful bite-sized tips for busy people) and even tone of voice (down-to-earth and easy to understand over corporate double-speak).”

                                                                                                                                                         - Nelson Jordan, Head of Marketing at Obodo

4. Website data

 

We mentioned behavioral data earlier, but it can be a great way to learn more about your prospects and customers. While it won’t necessarily tell you what they had for breakfast or what their biggest concern about work is right now, it can tell you a bit about how they interact with your website. 

Open up Google Analytics and take a look at: 
 

  • Which social media channels you get the most traffic from
  • Your most visited pages
  • The journey website visitors take when they land on your site
  • How many conversions you get on your product pages
  • What devices your visitors use the most

          

The Behavior Flow graph can tell you a bit about what pages visitors go to next and where they’re most likely to drop off. 

How to track psychographic factors 

 

Now you know what psychographic data is and how you can collect it, let’s take a look at how you can track it and use it in your marketing efforts. 

 

1. Segmentation 

 

Segmenting your customers means you can send personalized messages to them at just the right time. Consumers today actively seek out brands that personalize their communications. In fact, 91% of people are more likely to invest in a brand that provides relevant offers and recommendations. 

Segment customers based on psychographic factors 

 

Different customers will want different things from you. Segmenting them based on their interests or key psychographic data means you can serve the information they want.

Let’s say you own an accounting software and have two distinct audiences: 

Small business owners who are time-crunched and tired. They are keen to automate their accounting as much as possible but still want to be in control of their finances
Accountants who manage multiple clients at once. They want to streamline their processes and provide accurating, fast reports for their clients on a monthly basis 

Segmenting these two customer types based on their role and needs means you can send relevant and appropriate marketing materials to them. The accountant might be interested in demos and videos about juggling multiple accounts at once, while the small business owner wouldn’t find much use in that since it’s just their own account they’re managing. 

Try segmenting your customers based on: 

  • Their goals
  • Their challenges
  • Their interests
  • Their life stage
  • Their lifestyle choices
  • Their political views
  • Their hobbies

Segment customers based on psychographic factors 

 

Different customers will want different things from you. Segmenting them based on their interests or key psychographic data means you can serve the information they want.

Let’s say you own an accounting software and have two distinct audiences: 

Small business owners who are time-crunched and tired. They are keen to automate their accounting as much as possible but still want to be in control of their finances
Accountants who manage multiple clients at once. They want to streamline their processes and provide accurating, fast reports for their clients on a monthly basis 

Segmenting these two customer types based on their role and needs means you can send relevant and appropriate marketing materials to them. The accountant might be interested in demos and videos about juggling multiple accounts at once, while the small business owner wouldn’t find much use in that since it’s just their own account they’re managing. 

Try segmenting your customers based on: 

  • Their goals
  • Their challenges
  • Their interests
  • Their life stage
  • Their lifestyle choices
  • Their political views
  • Their hobbies

How marketers can understand prospect behavior 

 

Having instant access to customer psychographic data is invaluable for understanding prospect behavior, clubbing customers into different segments, and personalizing messaging. 

 

Behavior tracking: Website and email tracking 

 

One of the easiest ways to find out more about your customers and their needs is to track how they engage with your email marketing efforts and how they navigate your website. 

Define your segments by how people interact with your website or campaigns. You can add custom events to suit your needs and build out segments based on the links people click, the pages they visit, and their abandoned carts

Use Google Analytics to track user journeys, pages visited, and key conversion points, and tap into your email marketing provider to track: 

Open Rate

Determine how many people open your emails. The average email open rate sits between 15% and 25% depending on your industry. If it falls below this percentage, you might need to re-think who you’re targeting and what they need from you. 

Click Through Rate

The click through rate in your emails will show you how interested your customers are in what you’re offering. The higher the click rate, the more likely you are to be sending out the right information. Track which pages and links get the most clicks, as this will show you which topics, subjects, and products your customers are most interested in. 

Reply Rate

If you’re getting insightful replies from your prospects, chances are you’re sending them good information. Track how many replies you get from each email to determine how engaged your customers are with different topics and at different points in their journey. 

Bounce Rate

How quickly do people leave your website? If you’re directing prospects to certain pages on your website but they’re not sticking around when they get there, there’s a high chance you’re missing the mark with the information you’re offering them. 

How a marketing automation software can help track website and email data

Marketing software aren’t just good for segmenting your customers; they can also help you dig into how your customers interact with emails and how they navigate your site. 
 

1. View insightful data

Your marketing automation software can pull in data on each customer that details how they interact with your emails, what their journey on your website looks like, and their behavior while on-site. Get an end-to-end view of every customer, understand their activities, and segment them according to their interests. 

  • Identify hot leads and get a complete view into their activities and engagement
  • Segment prospects and customers based on attributes and behavior

2. Handle omni-channel communication with journeys

Send the custom content you create, like case studies or customized landing pages to different prospects based on their psychographic traits. Create tailored campaigns using journey builder in Freshmarketer based on real-time data. Communicate seamlessly across email and chat from within the software

3. Run A/B tests for different target groups

Behavioural data combined with psychographics can be very powerful in understanding who your prospect is as a person, and what actions they perform on your website. This will ultimately help you understand their needs, and target better. to Freshmarketer collects your visitor’s behavioral attributes that you want to track like how they arrived on your site, how often they add items to their cart, how much they spend, and what product categories they’re most interested in. With unique insights into every audience segment, discover what works for them, and optimize your pages to get maximum conversions from targeted audience segments.

4. Track campaign metrics with ease

Go beyond the conventional metrics like open rates, click rates, etc., and get down to the nitty-gritty details of how your campaign is performing with analytics.

Visualize how your campaigns fare and create powerful custom reports to identify its ROI.

Identfiy how different target groups are performing, and make changes to your website landing pages and email campaigns based on the metrics. 

Applying psychographics to marketing

Armed with a good understanding of who your prospects are and what they need from you, it’s time to apply your findings to your marketing campaigns. 

1. Behavior-based segmentation

Segmenting prospects based on psychographic data will improve your targeting since you have a better understanding of the person behind the statistic.

Prospects aren’t just personas or numbers anymore; they’re real people you are reaching out to who have specific desires. 

Segment prospects based on: 
 

  • Their biggest challenges right now
  • Their pain points and struggles
  • Their goals, hopes, and dreams
  • Their specific lifestyle choices
  • Their interactions on your website

Once you’ve segmented prospects based on their attributes, you can craft content that suits their individual needs. 

 

behavior based segmentation

2. Personalize outreach campaigns

When you understand the person behind the screen, you can create messages that are precise and personal. This will increase your chances of conversion and help you create deeper connections with your audience. 

When sending out personalized email campaigns, think about:

When you have detailed psychographic data on your customers, you’ll know the right platforms to use to reach them, the right words to create an impact, avoid pitch angles they don’t like, and know the right times to reach out to them. 

On top of this, you can choose the right reward for each prospect who engages with your marketing content because you understa
 

 

3. Help sales with more qualified leads

Instead of searching around in the dark for leads or sharing leads that aren’t sales-ready, psychographic data can help you get closer to prospects before you pass them across to the sales team.

By sharing your learnings about prospect habits and behavior, you give the sales team more context they can use to take the conversation forward. 

 

4. Retain existing customers

Relationships don’t end after the sale.

By speaking to existing customers and understanding their ongoing needs, you can continue to serve them great content and products long after their initial conversion.

Tracking psychographic data can help you understand the evolving needs of prospects, maintain their brand loyalty, and improve client retention. 

Using psychographics to create better marketing opportunities

 

Psychographics are the key to getting to know your customers better. The more you know about them, the more you can personalize outreach and marketing messages to suit their wants and needs.

Start by learning who your customers are. You can do this by holding customer interviews, putting together surveys and questionnaires, listening on social media, or tracking website data. Then, use this information to segment prospects and create marketing campaigns based on their unique interests and lifestyles.